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Wagon Fight by wraithdt Wagon Fight by wraithdt
This is my first Ancient Warfare Magazine illustration.

This scene is attached to an article about Trajan's campaign against the Dacian's and depicts a group of Roman soldiers attacking a wagon convoy made up of woman and children and protected by a handful of Bastarnae warriors wielding the fearsome falx. As protection against these weapons Roman legionaries wear additional right arm armor called a 'manica' and reinforced helmets, which became a signature look for Trajan's legions in Dacia. The Roman auxiliaries, as depicted on the side, were more lightly armored.

More info about the Dacian Wars >> en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trajan%2…
Info about Bastarnae >> en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bastarna…

For those interested you can check out the magazine here. >> www.karwansaraypublishers.com/…
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:iconzeonista:
Zeonista Featured By Owner May 14, 2015
The exertion of the falxman and the reaction of the legionnaire (who will be disciplined for losing his greaves, tsk) are excellent.
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:iconwolfwithglasses:
WolfwithGlasses Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2015
Attacking civilians, this is what roman legionairs were good at too >.>
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:iconzeonista:
Zeonista Featured By Owner Edited May 14, 2015
The idea of refraining from attacking non-combatants is an idea from Christian times. Trajan and the other pre-Christian warrior emperors and consuls built an empire on a mountain of bones and ashes, and slept well at night. In our oh-so-modern 20th & 21st centuries entire cities have burned, much like the Romans in action. ;)
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:iconwolfwithglasses:
WolfwithGlasses Featured By Owner May 14, 2015
Yep, and the oh so good christians were as great as butchers as the romans. No culture is free of that.
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:iconzeonista:
Zeonista Featured By Owner May 14, 2015
It was the early leaders of the Church who urged laws to be passed concerning the safety of women and noncombatants. The Church urged the Truce of God prohibiting fighting on Sundays and holy days. The Church promoted the idea of Chivalry, which proclaimed the image of the knight as defender and protector of the physically weak, the politically powerless, and of course the sanctity of Holy Church. Not all of those ideas stuck, or were universally followed, but the idea was there, and perpetuated, so that by the Age of Enlightenment the idea of "total warfare" was held in contempt, and the Duke of Cumberland could be criticized in Parliament and the British Press for the slaughter that followed Culloden, which the average Roman commander would have considered all in a day's work. Without the Church's historic pleas for mercy and justice and the worth of all people before God, there would be no modern institutions like the Geneva Conventions and Amnesty International. It was the non-Christian dictatorships of the 20th century who collectively pulled humanity back into the abyss, since wanton and pitiless destruction invites reprisal to the same degree.
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:iconwolfwithglasses:
WolfwithGlasses Featured By Owner May 14, 2015
The protection of a Knight had also a large negative Element. The protected Person and all his Descendants became unfree Serfs.

But you are right on the point about the modern institutions. Especially in modern history the Christian Confessionals, like the Catholic and Prostestant Church had large part in the ideals that led to their creation. At least if you think of the reasonable elements and not the religious extremists that also exist in Christian Confessional Groups. But that is another thing. Afterall, humans will be humans. >.>
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:iconzeonista:
Zeonista Featured By Owner May 15, 2015
As a Believer, I have learned not to confuse the institution, which is of Man, and prone to error, and the message, which is Divine and always works to the good. The Roman Catholic Church has a bad popular image which seems stuck in the mode of the bloated and overbearing edifice of circa 1500 CE. The Church of Rome eventually took in more control and power than they originally wanted or needed, but as the Designated Spokesmen For Civilization for nearly 1,000 years they didn't do too bad. Much of what are considered universal human rights these days starts with the Christian message that all humans are equal before God, and the salvation through-and good works of-Jesus Christ are to the benefit of everyone regardless of race, age, or gender. All Luther and Calvin really did was re-set the idea to the original Gospel message of individual salvation without recourse to institutional process (and institutional baggage). 
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:iconmilton49:
milton49 Featured By Owner May 16, 2015
It is rare for me to find a believer who can defend his faith in the way which you have here. I wish more of our christian brothers and sisters were like you Zeonista.
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:iconzeonista:
Zeonista Featured By Owner May 18, 2015
It's difficult to defend Faith itself, since that is a quality that one has or has not on a personal level. For the unchurched or the backslider, it may be useful to point out the places where Faith has led to Works which have had a positive result on the world at large. "Prepare ye a way of the Lord", and the devoted Faithful have been doing that for nearly 2,000 years now.
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(1 Reply)
:icondaniel-gleebits:
Daniel-Gleebits Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2015  Hobbyist Writer
No army prior to the 20th century could claim innocence from attacking civilians. Indeed, at times, attacking civilians was the main object of certain military campaigns.

:flaguk::salute:
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:iconamelianvs:
AMELIANVS Featured By Owner Mar 17, 2015  Student Traditional Artist
Well, not even armies of today could claim total innocence from attacking civilians.
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:icondaniel-gleebits:
Daniel-Gleebits Featured By Owner Mar 17, 2015  Hobbyist Writer
Oh no, by no means. Whether by accident or design, civilian casualties are a reality of war where civilians are present.
But only in the modern day has there been consistent wide-spread condemnation of civilian casualties, and an attempt by international bodies to halt it

:flaguk::salute:
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:icongwarh:
Gwarh Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2015
Excellent Facial expressions
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:iconlordofthememes:
Lordofthememes Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2014
Grozav( Awesome in Romanian) the home of Dacians
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:icondudeguy048:
Dudeguy048 Featured By Owner Sep 15, 2014
Hi! do you do drawings for people? Cuase I have some really awesome ideas!
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:iconjanas-aurora:
Janas-Aurora Featured By Owner Sep 6, 2014
Go Dacians!~
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:iconcolonelbsacquet:
ColonelBSacquet Featured By Owner Aug 26, 2014
Legionnaires!! In the name of the Emperor, LET THE NO FIGHTERS LIVE !!!
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:iconamelianvs:
AMELIANVS Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2014  Student Traditional Artist
Fighters?They were actually killing also armless women and children.And by the way not all those Roman soldiers are Legionaries.
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:iconcolonelbsacquet:
ColonelBSacquet Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2014
True, true. In those times, distinction between who fought, and who was an unarmed civilian was pretty much inexistant, most of the time. In the eyes of the attackers, at least.
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:iconamelianvs:
AMELIANVS Featured By Owner Nov 19, 2014  Student Traditional Artist
Now we speak more the same language .-)
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:iconaikiyun:
AikiYun Featured By Owner Jun 6, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Omg I read that issue with this illustration in it!
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:iconcherrybros:
Cherrybros Featured By Owner Apr 30, 2014  Hobbyist Artist
really well done
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:iconartbrojohn:
ArtbroJohn Featured By Owner Mar 24, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
Great work!
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:iconhaloband:
haloband Featured By Owner Mar 13, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Awesome work. Love the expressions, and emotion of this scene.
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:iconraubritter:
Raubritter Featured By Owner Feb 13, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
.... I own many books with your work... Actually I learned drawing with a lot of them...

I LOOOVE YOU
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:iconbrowncoatmando:
BrowncoatMando Featured By Owner Dec 21, 2013  Hobbyist

Love me some Dacians... 

Rome- seriously overrated- good yes but far from infallible.

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:iconrelativeequinox:
RelativeEquinox Featured By Owner Nov 29, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
Oh wow! You rarely see Late Romans portrayed, very nice.
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:iconamelianvs:
AMELIANVS Featured By Owner Jan 24, 2014  Student Traditional Artist
But this are not Late Romans...at least if you dont consider Roman army of Trajan from the height of the empire to be late Romans .-)
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:iconrelativeequinox:
RelativeEquinox Featured By Owner Jan 24, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
Oh, my bad, for some reason my brain interpreted that scale mail as chain XD.
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:iconamelianvs:
AMELIANVS Featured By Owner Jan 24, 2014  Student Traditional Artist
Sorry for souding little pedantic .-)...but-It doesn't matter even in the case if it was all chain mail armour.Mail armour says nothing about if something is late Roman or not as this type of protection was always the main,most commonly used in the imperial army and very likely also preffered type of armour by the soldiers themselves.Even duringTrajanic times.
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:iconrelativeequinox:
RelativeEquinox Featured By Owner Jan 24, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
Isn't it most associated with the Late though? Like with the Limatanei and the Comitatense? Constantintian stuff?
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:iconamelianvs:
AMELIANVS Featured By Owner Jan 24, 2014  Student Traditional Artist
Well chain mail was indeed the most common type in late period but that is simply because famous(and in popular culture very much ovehyped)plate armour was not used for infanty anymore.But if you look more into past it was Republican army which mainly created the Empire and these republican soldiers also done it very much in mail armour only,with no plate armour around.And- mainly-as I already said,even at the height of the empire it was chain male what was the most whidespered and common type  despite modern imagination so focused on image of the Roman soldiers in plate armour almost like a clone army.Also always in comletely every period of roman military history more types of armor were in use never only one.
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:iconmanwith0name:
manwith0name Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
Very realistic- you did not neglect to five the people dynamic facial expressions!
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:iconemerson-fialho:
Emerson-Fialho Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2013  Professional Artist
Wow! :iconbravoplz:
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:iconbikemerc:
bikemerc Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2013
Very good! I've read that roman training was to absorb overhead blow with shield and counter with a low thrust. Gut the barbarians!

Also, Ive read that they have never found a roman eagle.
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:iconalansteenhouwer:
AlanSteenhouwer Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2013
... and split shields.
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:iconbikemerc:
bikemerc Featured By Owner Nov 29, 2013
I was skeptical, but did some reading, from Wikipedia;  

"The Scutum is light enough to be held in one hand and its large height and width covered the entire wielder, making him very unlikely to get hit by missile fire and in hand-to-hand combat. The metal boss, or umbo, in the center of the scutum also made it an auxiliary punching weapon as well. Its composite construction meant that early versions of the scutum could fail from a heavy cutting or piercing blow which was experienced in the Roman Campaigns against Carthage and Dacia where the Falx and Falcata could easily penetrate and rip through the scutum. The effects of these weapons prompted design changes that made the scutum more resilient such as thicker planks and metal edges."

Falx wasnt a person, but a heavy curved blade, right?

SO, Ill give you that, but it doesnt negate my statement about roman training. Are there any good books on the Dacian campaign? Im a big ancient war buff. A recent good read was on scipio africanus, what an amazing general, zama was a battle for the ages.


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:iconalansteenhouwer:
AlanSteenhouwer Featured By Owner Nov 29, 2013
It's the weapon the guy in the foreground is weilding, upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia… , and here's what it does to the shield 0-media-cdn.foolz.us/ffuuka/bo… .

Of course it doesn't. Just at this point the shield is woefully inadequate for the technique to work. The falx would chop through the shield, and the tip would penetrate the helmet, lodging in the legionary's brain (all while staying out of range of their gladius). 

I generally get my information from tv, and my books on the subject tend to have a broader range. That said, if you don't have it, try Terry Jones' Barbarians, it covers all the peoples Rome came in contact with.

By the way, I might be interested in expanding my library, any suggestions would nice.
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:iconbikemerc:
bikemerc Featured By Owner Dec 3, 2013
Yep, I checked it out . The romans weren't infallable. They were also very small compared to gauls and probably dacians too. There discipline was the key. 

I like any history books by victor davis hanson, especially the one about tyhe western way of war. It connects the us military all the way back to hoplites. I also read a very good bio of Gen Patton, by carlos something or other. My library had one book available on scipio africanus and it was very good, ill probably reread. Ceasar's commentarys are excellent, but very long and it can be a tough read.

Ive heard of the barbarians book, ill check it out.

Ive read that roman spears had a thin breakaway tip, so they couldnt be thrown back. The shield was often used in offense as well, with that big tip in the center ( forgot the name).
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:iconalansteenhouwer:
AlanSteenhouwer Featured By Owner Dec 3, 2013
Yes it was. The Boudica Revolt was a clear example of discipline over numbers.

Thanks. I'll look into those.

Hope you enjoy it.

It was their Pilum javelin, and it didn't so much break as bend. Besides killing people the tip would sometimes lodge in the wood of the enemy shield, bend, and be stuck there, removable only in the time not allowed by a battle. Either he hefted it around with him, or discarded the shield. And they did use their Scutum in a sort of punching attack with the metal boss in the center, but it was more of a stunning blow, as they would be unable to produce the force to kill, considering how they gripped the shield.
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:iconalansteenhouwer:
AlanSteenhouwer Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2013
Maybe with other weapons, but that Falx the dacian has, was known to punch right through the helmet.
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:iconurrrrrrrrr:
urrrrrrrrr Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2013
nice work
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:icontoyotomiinfinity:
toyotomiinfinity Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Roma Victrix, heheheh. Dacians were great warriors, but Traianus was too good general and then legions were stillon the top of their power. Great art.
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:iconalansteenhouwer:
AlanSteenhouwer Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2013
Loving their irregular look. One has chain, one has lorica Squamata.
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:icongwaylar:
Gwaylar Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
So much win in this.
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:iconnuvolavolpe:
NuvolaVolpe Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2013
:#1:
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:iconzaigwast:
Zaigwast Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2013
Waahaaaaaaaaaa...... great piece of art man ! :la: ...

greatings from Romānia !!!!! :la:
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:iconblue-jedi:
Blue-Jedi Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2013
Very reminiscent of the late Angus McBride. 
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:iconcarlitosmoff:
CarlitosMoff Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2013
My money is on the roman dude, sadly.
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:iconlord-fingolfin:
Lord-Fingolfin Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2013
aside from the obvious artistic qualitie, one can only love the historical effort you seam to put into the works. Bravo.
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